« Jasper Johns Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom | Eye Level Home | Five Questions with Thomas Lovejoy »

The Art of Video Games: Vote Now!
February 18, 2011


Video Games Voting

On March 16, 2012, the Smithsonian American Art Museum will open The Art of Video Games, a major exhibition that will explore the forty-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium. We're working with curator Chris Melissinos to develop the exhibition, and have been having a lot of fun doing so! Video games are inherently interactive, so early on we decided that the selection of materials should be interactive, too. As Chris says, "we want the content of the exhibition to reflect the voices of the players as well as the artists and developers." For this reason, we are opening up the selection of games to a public vote!

We launched the voting website at noon on Monday, February 14 and were immediately overwhelmed with the huge response. After just four days, we’ve received almost 1 million votes from people in all 50 states and 139 countries! Voting will close on April 7, 2011, and we will announce the results in May. Click here to get started.


Posted by Georgina on February 18, 2011 in American Art Here, Museums & Technology



Comments

You know what, I never considered video games as interactive art until I read this post. Thanks for posting!

Posted by: Masha Dowell | Feb 24, 2011

Pretty amazing that video games have been around for forty years now!

Posted by: Branson | Mar 2, 2011

Video games are indeed interactive, but on very different levels depending on the target audience. Often games geared towards young children are less interactive than more mainstream games played by teenagers.
Looking away from the immediate expression you get from a game (graphics and sound) I believe it is the interactive part that dictates the success of a game, whether the purpose is pure entertainment or a learning experience.
A lot of bad things have been said about the influence of video/computer games on young people over the past years, but I believe the beneficial effects are often overlooked. Games can be designed and used in several ways to improve certain skills ranging from math or language to simple hand/eye coordination. From personal experience I know for a fact that my English (I am from Denmark) has definitely been influenced in a positive way by games, where reading and writing played a major role being it from the game itself or from chatting with other players.

Posted by: Aagekold | Mar 3, 2011

Hmm.. which one do you think is the coolest game?

Posted by: Hellaii | Mar 3, 2011


The comments to this entry are closed.



Related Posts with Thumbnails